Safe Driving for Teens

The Ford Motor Company...
and Governors Highway Safety Association have a developed a Web site that is dedicated to safe teenage driving. The focus is on skills young drivers need. There’s also information for parents.

Parental Rules
Linked to Safer
Teen Driving...
This national study found that adolescents are more likely to drive safely when their parents restrict their driving and monitor their whereabouts. Teens also are more likely to drive dangerously if they engage in risky behaviors.

Drive Safer-Talk
Later...
Tips from AAA Auto Club South on safe driving and cell phone use.

Just One Night...
An in-depth look at the realities of teen drinking and driving. Facts about drinking, how to be a friend to someone who is drinking, and the consequences of driving under the influence.

 

Teenagers face a different reality than the rest of us the instant they get behind the wheel: car crashes are the number one cause of death among their peers.

If you’re a young driver you can decrease the risk by limiting your night driving and observing speed limits. There are many such safe driving strategies.

For instance, you might also work to gain a better understanding of your craving for the sensation of speed and the tendency to take risks -- and explore ways to use that knowledge to modify your behavior.

WAKE UP TO DROWSINESS:
Driving while fatigued causes approximately 100,000 crashes each year. Fatigue slows reaction time, decreases awareness and inhibits correct judgment. Experts say the best response to fatigue is to pull over and take a nap. Caffeine, loud music, or open windows are only a temporary solution
DOWNSHIFT THAT SPEEDING HABIT:
The time required to avoid a crash is reduced by speed and the likelihood of a crash increases. The severity does, too. When your speed increases from 40 mph to 60 mph, for example, the energy released by a collision more than doubles.
BY ALL MEANS, THANK YOU:
Exhibiting greater courtesy and consideration for other drivers can make driving safer.
WATCH THE WEATHER:
Failing to adjust to adverse weather conditions can prove fatal. Experts caution that you slow down, anticipate adjustments, and use appropriate braking techniques. At 40 mph, in a car that normally takes 110 feet to stop on dry pavement, it takes 200 feet to stop in the rain and 770 feet to stop on ice.
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